Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ Category

Kisses for Valentine’s

The Monastery presents traditionally on 14th February  an exhibition with a theme related to Valentine’s. In 2010, the chosen theme is the kiss in the western painting. We have selected 12 outstandig kisses from the Baroc period to the beginning of the 20th century.

The Kiss - Exhibition at the Monastery

All the paintings of the exhibition are available in Flickr in a better resolution:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/23562881@N05/sets/72157623432513602/

There also a romantic place where you can take pictures that you can share with our group in Flickr:

http://www.flickr.com/groups/themonastery/pool/

Read Full Post »

The Monastery is proud to present a new exhibition whose title is “Angels. The Representation of Angels in the Western Painting“.

The angel is a spiritual creature and its representation in art has changed over time.

In the Middle Age, the angel has a masculine aspect. He is thin and has a modest expression. He is wearing a dress. He will get later another important attribute: the halo. He is rarely flying in the sky.

In the late Middle Age, the angel look like a young person of great beauty, a being quite earthly and sensual. The angel of the Renaissance is also represented in sceneries with impressive architectural perspective.

The discovery of paintings and sculptures from the Antiquity during the Renaissance will deeply change the representation of the angel. Angels are now little chubby cherubs flying in the sky. They are inspired by putti, antic representations of the god Eros or Cupid.

Gradually, the angel gets a purely decorative role, without any spiritual meaning. The Barroco period of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries provides a great place for little cherubs playing in clouds.

Everything change in the the nineteenth century, the romantic period. The angel is now a beautiful female figure, unreal and fragile. The Pre-Raphaelites, the academic art with William Bouguereau, the Symbolists with Gustave Moreau, as well as the Art Nouveau represent angels as a winged female figure.

The exhibition present also five artworks made by Second Life four artists and designers

– Feathers Boa (Broken Angel)
– Ronnie Rhode (Bright and shiny Angel Statue)
– Ainee Kohime (Angel Sculpture)
– Anathaniel Gausman (Chemin de l’ange, Papillon et ange)

Sign of the exhibition "Angels. The Representation of Angels in Western Painting"

Sign of the exhibition "Angels. The Representation of Angels in Western Painting"

Read Full Post »

Passenger only

You are on the passenger sit besides the driver and you are going through one of the longest road tunnels of the world, the St. Gotthard Tunnel (16.4 kilometres). You have a smartphone whose brand is an delicious fruit. What do you do?  Let’s shake the light! The smartphone has a long time of exposition. If you shake it while you take the picture, you will get strange effects.

Passenger only

Passenger only

The pictures presented in this exhibitions were taken by Arria Perreault in St. Gotthard Tunnel in october 2009.

SLURL: http://slurl.com/secondlife/Monastery/171/112/99

Read Full Post »

To celebrate its re-opening on a new sim, the Monastery presents some examples of other monasteries of Second Life.

Monastery derives from the Greek word “monos” which means “alone”. It denotes the building, or complex of buildings, that houses a room reserved for prayer as well as the domestic quarters and workplace(s) of monastics, whether monks or nuns, and whether living in community or alone (hermits).

In most religions the life inside monasteries is governed by community rules that stipulates the gender of the inhabitants and requires them to remain celibate and own little or no personal property. The degree to which life inside a particular monastery is socially separate from the surrounding populace can also vary widely; some religious traditions mandate isolation for purposes of contemplation removed from the everyday world, in which case members of the monastic community may spend most of their time isolated even from each other. Others are focused on interacting with the local communities in order to provide some service, such as teaching, medical care, or evangelism. Some monastic communities are only occupied seasonally, depending both on the traditions involved and the local weather, and people may be part of a monastic community for periods ranging from a few days at a time to almost an entire lifetime.

The life within the walls of a monastery may be supported in several ways: by manufacturing and selling goods, often agricultural products such as cheese, wine, beer, liquor; by donations or alms; by rental or investment incomes; and by funds from other organizations within the religion which in the past has formed the traditional support of Monasteries.

(Free adaptation of the Wikipedia article “Monastery”)

Besides religious rituals and spiritual practices, monasteries have played an important role in the transmission of knowledge. In the european Middle Age, books were copied in monasteries by monks. Some monasteries were also educational institutions where pupils were sent by their family. Many monasteries had an important library.

In this exhibition, there are several examples of Monasteries found on Second Life. Three of them are christian, one is buddhist. The last one is fictionnal (from the TV serie Star Trek).

Sainte-Catherine Monastery in Sinai

Sainte-Catherine Monastery in Sinai

http://slurl.com/secondlife/Monastery/171/105/99

List of monasteries

  • Monastery of Felix Meritis, Lill Burn Valley
    The Monastery of Felix Meritis is an italian renaissance style cloister. It has a cathedral, a church, dorms, cells,  chapels, library, gardens, valley & farms.
  • St, Benedict’s Monastery, Wildcat
    St. Benedict’s Monastery was built by Eva Virgo on one-half Wildcat sim. The building is inspired by the Cistercian “Abbey of Fontenay” in France. It includes a Gate House, Cloister, Chapter Room, meditation rotundas, Chapel, Bell Tower, & Graveyard.
  • St. Catherine’s Monastery, Odessa Captivating
    This building is inspired by St. Catherine’s Monastery, Sinai, Egypt. It includes icons and a Library and the main Katholicon and the Mosaic of the Transfiguration.
  • Dharma Gate Monastery, Mieum
    This place is modeled loosely after Tassajara Zen Mountain Monastery.
  • The Vulcan monastery, P’Jem, Eridani
    The Vulcan monastery, P’Jem, is a part of the  Star Trek Museum. It was created by Tsora Enoch, Chief Engineer of the Museum, on the Vulcan sim, Eridani. In the saga, it is located on a planet near Andoria and was destroyed in 2125.

Read Full Post »

Forum Romanum

The Roman Forum, sometimes known by its original Latin name of Forum Romanum, is located between the Palatine hill and the Capitoline hill of the city of Rome. In the foreground, the three columns are the remains of one of the older edifice in the area, the temple of Castor and Pollux, originally built in gratitude for victory at the battle of Lake Regillus (495 BC). Castor and Pollux were the twin sons of Jupiter and Leda.

Forum Romanum

Forum Romanum

Ruins of the Forum, Looking towards the Capitol

Map of Rome

Read Full Post »

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine (Italian: Arco di Costantino) is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I’s victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312.

Arch of Constantine

Arch of Constantine

A View of the Forum, painted by Giovanni Battista BUSIRI

BUSIRI, Giovanni Battista, Rome: A View of the Forum, 1720
Oil on canvas, 48 x 63 cm, private collection

Map of Rome

Read Full Post »

Arch of Titus

The Arch of Titus has provided the general model for many of the triumphal arches erected since the 16th century.

Arch of Titus, Rome

The Arch of Titus is a marble triumphal arch located on the Via Sacra just to the south-east of the Forum in Rome. It was constructed by the emperor Domitian shortly to commemorate the capture of Jerusalem in 70.

View of the Arch of Titus painted by Caspar Andriaans van WITTEL

Rome: View of the Arch of Titus, Caspar Andriaans van WITTEL, 1710
Oil on canvas, 31 x 40 cm, private collection

Map of Rome

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »